Viral Hepatitis

Viral Hepatitis B Or C

Hepatitis B is a vaccine-preventable liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B is spread when blood, semen, or other body fluids from a person infected with the virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. This can happen through sexual contact; sharing needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment; or from mother to baby at birth. Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Hepatitis C is spread through contact with blood from an infected person.

Hepatitis B infection can be prevented by getting vaccine and HBIG (hepatitis B immune globulin) soon after coming into contact with the virus. Persons who have recently been exposed to HBV should get HBIG and vaccine as soon as possible and preferably within 24 hours, but not more than 2 weeks after the exposure. The best way to prevent hepatitis C is by avoiding behaviors that can spread the disease, especially injecting drugs. Getting tested for hepatitis C is important, because treatments can cure most people with hepatitis C in 8 to 12 weeks.
  • Symptoms
  • Dark urine

    or Black stool

    common

    Poor appetite

    common

    Fatigue

    common

    Feel like vomiting

    or Throwing up

    common

    Fever

    • Greater than or equal to 38°C (100.4°F), Less than 38°C (100. 4°F)

    common

    Yellow eyes or skin

    common

    Abdominal pain

    • In the upper right region

    common

    Itchy skin

  • Risk factors
  • Contaminated needle

    Recent sex

    • Without any kind of infection control

    History of Sexually Transmitted Infections

  • Treatment
  • Treatment for chronic hepatitis B may include: Antiviral medications. Several antiviral medications — including entecavir (Baraclude), tenofovir (Viread), lamivudine (Epivir), adefovir (Hepsera) and telbivudine (Tyzeka) — can help fight the virus and slow its ability to damage your liver. Hepatitis C is treated using direct acting antiviral (DAA) tablets. DAA tablets are the safest and most effective medicines for treating hepatitis C. They're highly effective at clearing the infection in more than 90% of people. The tablets are taken for 8 to 12 weeks.
  • Recommended specialist
  • If you have Viral Hepatitis, then a visit to a general internist is highly recommended.

    Contact a

    General internist

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