Raising a child

Raising a child

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AO

17 hours ago by Anonymous Orange

What to expect during the first month ✨
Your baby will need lots of sleep, but they also need to eat frequently. So, they’ll sleep in bursts ranging from about 20 minutes to 4 hours before they’re ready to eat again. Their awake windows (time spent awake between sleeps) will be quite short, less than an hour in a lot of cases. Most of this time will be spent feeding and changing their nappy/diaper, so don’t worry about keeping them up for “play”time. This will naturally start to occur as they get older and can tolerate being awake for longer. Babies are born with immature sleep/wake cycles. This means they don’t know day from night, so it might feel like your little one is nocturnal 🌙 sleeping most of the day and up more at night 🥱 Your baby is adjusting to life outside the womb, so you might also find that they are happier and sleep longer when on you 🤗 These early weeks are exhausting, yes. But, it doesn’t last forever 💕 How old is your little one? Or are you expecting in the new year?
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Raising a child
Afraid of raising a child before I first fix mysel
Sometimes its best to first work on yourself and make sure you as a person have healed yourself and are responsible and whole, before raising a child and god forbid imprint bad habits/trauma within them. This is your responsibility so make sure you are set first
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AS

2 months ago by Anonymous Strawberry

Young children don't have the same concept of time like we do or a sense of urgency or a any idea about everything that needs to happen on any given day - And they shouldn't have to. How we help them move through the day's activities and tasks joyfully has a great impact on how they experience life. For young children, life is play and playful. They want to experience life in an imaginative way. One way to help your child is to "meet" them where they are developmentally as this eases tension and stress for them and us. In parenting challenges arise when our child doesn't listen and you find yourself saying the same thing over and over again. From the Waldorf perspective, the first seven years is a time when young children are working hard to master skills, self-regulate and be in control of their growing body and actions. So when it comes to a young child listening to us, they need our help. Here's how to do it - It might be magic but young children become excellent listeners when we use our words to “paint pictures" instead of giving them direct commands, ultimatums or yelling at them. When you "paint pictures" with your words you create little stories - which are become in the moment “live picture books" for your child to climb into and they make your words come alive for your child because you've given them playful imagery to connect to. This meets them where they are developmentally! And when you connect with your child in an imaginative playful way, there's joy, excitement, laugher AND listening! Your child will be interested in what you have to say to them because you’re being playful. This is also a way to connect with your inner child. So often as adults, we stop ourselves from living imaginatively in the moment. Connecting with your child in an imaginative way is important because it will also bring you joy. Being in this imaginative space does take work but with practice you'll discover how well your child listens and how quickly you'll be able to paint new pictures with your words. You'll create many other imaginative ways to guide your child through the day
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AP

2 months ago by Anonymous Pineapple

Envisioned parenthood
When we envisioned parenting, many of us saw frolicking in a field with a bouncy toddler, giggling over ice cream and lounging in a hammock as the sun softly glows behind us (just me?)✨ And so, when reality hits, and our kids don't listen to us or they spend the majority of their days saying, "NO!" Well, it's HARD. 💯 And? We also feel this responsibility to raise "good" kids. We don't want them to hit, shout or be rude. So we end up spending most of our days alternating between "disciplining" and shouting "no! stop!" But could we strike a balance? Could we make our kids feel seen, heard, & important, while teaching those big life skills in a CONSTRUCTIVE, loving way? We can. We will. We must. ⁠ This is important to remember: The feeling is always ok - sometimes, the behavior is not.⁠ We've probably all heard of "unconditional love," but what's it ACTUALLY mean? That your love isn't an if-then thing. ie, I'll love you... IF you listen to me, IF you don't hit your sister, IF you don't feel angry or sad. ⁠ 💛Show them you love them - no matter what 💛Let them know you'll always be on their team - no matter how much they mess up 💛Remember that "teaching" doesn't mean "punishing" - they're new to this whole life thing 💛Show them that you'll never leave them - no matter how much they've acted out 💛Apologize when you mess up - even if it's hard ⁠ And then, if the situation warrants it (e.g. there's kicking, hitting, etc.) you can coach and connect at a later time, when everyone is calm: ⁠ “You had a tough moment earlier today. It’s ok to feel mad, it’s not ok to hit.
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